Treatments

All across the U.S. jails are filled with people who need medical care and social services, many of whom cycle in and out of jail without ever receiving the help they need. One emerging model to combat this problem is deflection, which seeks to prevent individuals who have low to moderate criminogenic risk, but significant unmet social, economic, and health needs, from entering the criminal justice system. The goal of deflection programs is to lessen the burden on the criminal justice system by connecting those individuals—before they enter the criminal justice system—to treatment and social services to which they might not otherwise have access. This document is designed to: (1) provide a singular resource for each jurisdiction’s deflection laws; (2) allow for a comparison of these laws between jurisdictions; and (3) identify and highlight interesting provisions....

A newly released report from the United States Department of Justice indicates that among all state and federal prisoners, nearly four in 10 self-reported using drugs and three in 10 self-reported consuming alcohol, at the time of the offense for which they are currently serving a sentence in a correctional facility. Many of those individuals meet the clinical definition of having a substance or alcohol use disorder - 40% for substance use and just over 20% for alcohol. Of that population, 33% of state and 46% of federal prisoners, who met the criteria for having a substance or alcohol use disorder, reported participating in a treatment program after their admission to a correctional facility....

Newly incarcerated individuals who use substances require medical intervention to mitigate the effects of withdrawal symptoms and prevent death, suicide, and injury while in custody. Recent data show that nearly two thirds of sentenced individuals in jails meet the criteria for drug dependence or abuse. LAPPA’s Model Withdrawal Management Protocol in Correctional Settings Act requires evidence-based treatment of substance use disorders, including the use of FDA-approved medications; requires correctional settings to establish and implement administrative and clinical protocols when detaining individuals at risk of withdrawal; and provides state legislators, policymakers, and those in the correctional and health care professions with a comprehensive framework to better respond to withdrawal symptoms and related mental health crises of individuals in custody to decrease their mortality while in correctional settings. ...

In recent years, some states have enacted Good Samaritan and Naloxone Access laws to help reduce overdose deaths and respond to opioid overdoses.The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 included a provision for GAO to review these laws. This report addresses the following: (1) the efforts ONDCP has taken to collect and disseminate information on Good Samaritan and Naloxone Access laws, (2) the extent to which states, territories, and D.C. have these laws and the characteristics of them, and (3) what research indicates concerning the effects of Good Samaritan laws.To answer these questions, GAO collected and reviewed ONDCP documents and interviewed agency officials. GAO also reviewed and analyzed selected characteristics of jurisdictions' Good Samaritan and Naloxone Access laws. Further, GAO conducted a literature review of empirical studies published from 2010 through May 2020 that examined the effects of Good Samaritan laws....

LAPPA’s Model Recovery Residence Certification Act is designed to implement a voluntary certification process for recovery residences in a state. The purpose of certification is to allow for greater oversight of recovery residences and greater protection of recovery home residents. As currently drafted, the Model Act allows either a state agency designated by the state or an approved certifying organization under contract with the state agency to certify recovery residences under the program outlined in the Act. The Act also addresses the zoning issues that have arisen in local jurisdictions around the country. ...

LAPPA’s Model Expanding Access to Peer Recovery Support Services Act was written in consultation with a host of subject matter experts including peer support workers and credentialing professionals. The model provides a legislative framework for implementing a responsive and cohesive peer support worker credentialing program and offers policymakers in jurisdictions with established peer support programs dynamic strategies to improve their existing peer support credentialing process. ...

LAPPA’s Model Access to Medication for Addiction Treatment in Correctional Settings Act, written in collaboration with the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at the Georgetown University Law Center and a cadre of subject matter experts, sets forth a comprehensive, evidence-based framework for ensuring that all incarcerated individuals with a substance use disorder be provided access to FDA-approved medication for addiction treatment in state and local correctional settings....